How to Write a Condolence Note

condolence-note-how-to-write

This past spring, as Ive spoken about, my brother-in-law Paul died of lung cancer. My sister, Lucy, was flooded with condolence cards and flowers. I loved every single card, she said, Just getting a card felt so good. Yet a few things stuck out as especially touching. We spoke on the phone this week, and she shared what she has learned…

Snail mail a card. Every email, phone call, everything was wonderful; I was astounded by how kind people were. Physical cards were especially nice to hold onto. I didnt care at all what the card looked like. I have them in a basket in our living room and see them every day.

Describe how you can help. I was so grateful when people said, Let us know if theres anything we can do. But when people offered specifics, it felt even easier for me to take them up on their offers. One friend wrote, If you ever want to come over, we can grill and make grapefruit mojitos; wed love to see you and theres nothing we wouldnt do for you.

Tell stories. I loved when people wrote specific stories about Paul that Id never heard, and told me how he had impacted them, what they loved about him, positive things they observed about our relationship. I personally think, the more detail, the better. The grieving person is thinking about the person 100% of the time; nothing you say is going to make her sadder; instead, the stories you tell are going to make her feel connected.

Literally nothing is too cheesy to write. Whatever emotion youre feeling, its probably helpful to say. My friend Kimmy, who lives in Sweden, wrote, Im sending you love from across the ocean, as you swim through yours. Another friend wrote: When your grief feels dark and bottomless, know that we are here to reflect Pauls light and love back to you, whether its next month, next year or in ten years. If there is something that you think sounds pretty, go for it. They arent analyzing what you say they just feel so raw.

And there is nothing too great you can say about the person. One friend wrote, I last saw you both at a friends wedding; you were gorgeous, and Paul was strong, confident and deeply happy. The awe I felt for him, you, both of you was astounding, and it has only ever grown. I was blown away. Youre so starved for remembering and thinking youve lost something so great, when you hear something positive, its affirming and validating. You realize that people get what he meant to you. They understand, they think its important too. Your love is not lost in the world.

Of course, you dont have to be sentimental. One friend wrote, THIS SUCKS, and that felt great, too.

Consider involving kids. I liked when kids drew a picture of Paul and me. Sometimes they drew a random picture and that was sweet, too. One note said, Dear Lucy, Youre sad. Happy St. Patricks Day. I said a prayer for you last night. Im Mollys son. Love, Finn. And then he drew a four-leaf clover. One girl wrote Sick, Happy, Dr. Paul and then crossed out the word sick. That was before he died. Her mom was like, I guess she decided she didnt want him to be sick! It felt so poignant.

How to Write a Condolence Note

A drawing from a friends daughter. VM stands for very much.

Say youll never forget him or her. I like hearing that people will miss him. Someone sent me flowers and said, Thinking of you; we miss Paul dearly, and that meant a lot. A nurse who worked with him wrote, We cherish the moments we spent with Paul in the operating room; he will never be forgotten. Even though shes a stranger to me, its really comforting to know that a nurse out there will never forget him either.

Write, even if youre an acquaintance. A couple of people I didnt know well still wrote to me (old friends of Pauls, or the artist who illustrated Pauls New York Times essay). It meant so much. You dont have to be a close friend to write.

Reach out anytime. A few friends texted or sent flowers on the one-month anniversary of his death. Others sent a note a couple months later. They said, Were thinking of you, and that was nice. You are not better two months later. I can imagine it would feel good to receive flowers six months later, a year later.

lucy-paul

A photo of Lucy and Paul last Christmas.

Thank you so much, Lucy.

I hope this is helpful. Recently I came across this beautiful quote: When a person is bereaved, the simple, sincere expressions of sympathy you write are deeply felt and appreciated. At this time of withdrawal from the world, your letter can be a warm and understanding handclasp.

Lots of love to you all. xoxo

P.S. A trick to life, and the power of empathy.

(Top photo by Our Food Stories.)

Source

http://cupofjo.com/